How to Mosquito Proof Your Pool

Everyone wants to get away from the scorching heat of summer, and what better way than to take a dip in your pool? From Memorial Day to Labor Day, people of all ages take a dip to beat the heat. One of the not-so-fun things about pools opening are the mosquitoes that congregate around them. Don’t let mosquitoes turn your leisurely swim into a swat fest – use these tips for how to proof your swimming pool to keep mosquitoes away.

1. Cover Your Pool When Not In Use

Pool areas are the pride and joy of many homeowners. As beautiful as they can be to look at, it’s important to keep your pool covered when not in use. There are several types of pool covers you can purchase, each with their own set of benefits. These include standard winter covers, security covers, and automatic covers. The primary goal of a cover is to make sure your pool is protected from sunlight and any kind of debris. Most covers last a number of years before needing repair or replacement. To ensure protection from pests such as mosquitoes, make sure your cover doesn’t have any tears or rips that may make it easier for mosquitoes to access.

2. Empty Any Standing Water That May Collect In The Area

Standing water can be found in most areas surrounding pools. Because mosquitoes prefer warm, wet environments, this makes these areas perfect breeding grounds. Female mosquitoes only need a bottlecap full of water to lay eggs. When you think of the amount of water around backyard pools, it’s no wonder why they’re hot spots for mosquitoes! Water toys can make pool time even more enjoyable for kids. They can also become breeding areas for mosquitoes if left unattended, as they can collect water. Storing all pool equipment and toys indoors, can help decrease the amount of standing water that mosquitoes can use to multiply and wreak havoc.

3. Perform Regular Maintenance On Pools And Equipment

Having a pool in your backyard can make your home a favorite among friends and family, but it’s important to keep it in optimal condition. Regular pool maintenance can keep your pool safe for summer fun and help keep away pesky mosquitoes. Keep this checklist in mind before opening your pool for use:

  • Make sure your pool water is balanced and remove any contaminants that are present.
  • Repair any damage to the lining of your pool.
  • Ensure your filtration system is working correctly.
  • Clear out any obstructions from your pool skimmers.

Once you’ve completed everything on the list, your pool is ready for summer fun! It’s a good idea to create a regular maintenance schedule to ensure that your pool area is safe for the entire season.

Swimming can be a highlight of the summer, so don’t let those pesky mosquitoes interrupt your fun! Our barrier treatments ensure your pool areas are bite-free from sunup to sundown. The fun doesn’t have to end at your yard. Take advantage of our Share the MoJo program to refer Mosquito Joe to your family, friends, and neighbors who would also benefit from an itch-free summer. To find a Mosquito Joe in your area click here!

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Types of Mosquitoes

We know that mosquitoes can be a nuisance and ruin our outdoor fun, but they can also pose a far more serious threat. In fact, mosquitoes are considered one of the deadliest animals in the world due to the diseases they can transmit. Mosquitoes are guilty of spreading diseases, such as malaria, West Nile virus, Zika virus and much more. With 12 genera and about 176 species of mosquitoes in the United States, below are 3 major species that are culprits of spreading disease and causing those painful, itchy bites.

The Anopheles mosquito, better known as the malaria mosquito, can be found in every continent except for Antarctica. As you can guess from the name, this mosquito is known universally for being the primary vector of malaria. The Anopheles mosquito is also responsible for transmitting heartworm disease to animals. The female malaria mosquito can lay her eggs in a wide range of locations, including inground pools, small streams, freshwater marshes and any other place with clean, slow-moving water. The Anopheles mosquito is most active at two times: just before dawn and right after darkness sets. An interesting fact about the malaria mosquito is that they can still be found in areas where malaria has been eradicated, because the parasite that spreads the disease has been eliminated, not the mosquito itself.

The Aedes mosquito was originally found in tropical and subtropical zones, but can now also be found in all countries except Antarctica. They are visually distinctive because they have noticeable black and white markings on their bodies and legs. The Aedes mosquito is also unique in that they are active and bite only during the daytime, mostly early in the morning and in the evening before dusk. Some of the biggest culprits in the Aedes genus include:

  • The Aedes aegypti mosquito, aka Yellow Fever mosquito: The Aedes aegypti generally lives indoors and near people, resting in cool shaded places in houses, such as wardrobes, laundry areas and under furniture. They are sneaky pests that normally bite around people’s feet and ankles and may bite repeatedly. The Aedes Aegypti mosquito is most known for spreading yellow fever, a viral infection that can cause fever, headache and nausea.
  • The Aedes Albopictus Mosquito, aka Asian Tiger Mosquito: The Aedes Albopictus is the most invasive mosquito species in the world. The female Asian tiger mosquitoes leave behind an itchy, red bump on the skin while you are trying to enjoy your outdoor activities. They also lay their eggs in stagnant water, which can be found in old tires, flowerpots, birdbaths and clogged trains. That means something as small as a bottle cap can hold enough water for larvae, the immature form of insects, to develop.

The common house mosquito gets its name from its typical behavioral pattern – coming into your house and biting you between sunset and sunrise, disrupting your night with multiple itchy, painful bites. The Culex mosquitoes are weak flyers and do not fly very far from where they develop as larvae. Their adult lives are short, rarely more than 15 days. An interesting fact about these mosquitoes is that unlike other mosquitoes that die when the winter months arrive, the house mosquito can hibernate during winter in protected places like sewers, crawlspaces and basements.

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Fortunately, Mosquito Joe is here to help you rid your yard of any mosquito that is ruining your outdoor fun, as well as protect you from mosquito-borne illnesses. Here are a few ways you can help make sure mosquitoes don’t call your yard home:

  • Regularly empty ponds, bird baths, fountains, buckets, kids toys and anything else that may gather water.
  • Drill holes in tire swings, trash cans and recycle bins so stagnant water cannot accumulate.
  • Cut grass and shrubs short – adult mosquitoes gather to rest in shady areas.
  • Clean out gutters to avoid standing water.
  • Repair leaky outdoor faucets.
  • Call Mosquito Joe to rid your yard of mosquitoes and create a protective barrier around your property.

From barrier treatments, all-natural treatments, special events and more, we can provide many different mosquito control options that best fit your needs. Our team is built of mosquito control experts and we’re here to help eliminate mosquito breeding grounds on your property. If you would like more information on how we can eliminate these pesky mosquitoes so you can get back to enjoying your yard, find your local Mosquito Joe and give them a call today!

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