Lyme Disease: The Tick-Borne Illness You Need To Be Aware Of

When discussing potentially harmful pests, a common one you’ll often hear about is ticks. These strange creatures latch onto a host through physical contact. You might be out enjoying nature and inadvertently come in contact with them in the grass or by brushing against one on a tree branch. These opportunistic pests can also be transferred onto you by another person or your pet.

Unfortunately, these pests can negatively impact your health. While mosquitoes are known to carry certain diseases like West Nile or Zika, infected ticks can transmit Lyme disease, which can cause serious health issues for many people. The thought of ticks may have you asking the question: Where did Lyme disease originate? To help you better understand Lyme disease and its origin, the pest control experts at Mosquito Joe® have some valuable information to share.

What Is Lyme Disease?

Lyme disease is a product of the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, commonly found in ticks in the United States. While you can get Lyme disease from a tick bite, not all ticks carry the disease. But you should take extra precautions, especially when walking in areas that are heavily wooded or have a lot of tall grass.

Symptoms of Lyme Disease

Symptoms of Lyme disease can vary between individuals who are infected, and symptoms don’t always show up immediately. Lyme disease skin manifestations and other symptoms can begin to appear anywhere from 3 days to a month after the initial bite.

If you have be bitten by a tick or suspect you have Lyme disease, here are some critical signs to look for:

Stage One

  • A standard bug bite: Most people won’t know they’ve received a bite from a tick because they won’t feel the initial bite. Tick saliva has a chemical that acts as a local anesthetic. The chemical numbs the bite area, which often results in a bite going undetected. However, things can change by day three.
  • Rash: Rashes are common Lyme disease skin manifestations. They may not hurt, but they’ll be warm to the touch. It’s best to stay away from scratching it. The tell-tale sign of a tick bite is a bulls-eye rash that appears around the bite area. The rash is red in the center and has additional red rings of red around it, which may increase in size over time.
  • Fever, headache, chills: In addition to a rash, you may also experience a high fever, headache, and/or chills.

If you experience any of these symptoms after a tick bite, it’s important to seek medical attention as soon a s possible.

Stage Two

Failing to treat stage one of Lyme disease can lead to more severe symptoms in stage two, such as:

  • Widespread rashes over your entire body.
  • Extreme muscle soreness and weakness.
  • Facial weakness on one or both sides of the face.
  • Pain in lower limbs.

Once again, if any of these symptoms appear, you should seek help from a medical professional.

Stage Three

Stage three of Lyme disease includes many of the symptoms in stage two. However, a person may experience more pain and swelling in localized areas, such as the knees and other joints. You may also experience arthritis in certain joints.

FAQs About Lyme Disease

How Is Lyme Disease Diagnosed?

Lyme disease is tricky to diagnose because it shares similar symptoms with many other medical conditions. However, if you have been bitten by a tick or suspect that you may have Lyme disease, a blood test should be taken to confirm any presence of the disease.

It’s important to note that depending on when the test is administered, blood tests for Lyme disease are not always 100% accurate. During the early stages of the disease, a blood test may come back negative. However, if you receive positive results from your first blood test, you’ll be asked to submit another to determine the severity of your Lyme disease.

How Is Lyme Disease Treated?

Additional research still needs to be done to improve Lyme disease treatments. It is currently treated with antibiotics While this treatment is effective in the early stages, many people report experiencing long-term effects like fatigue and muscle pain.

Can You Get Lyme Disease From Mosquitoes?

When you hear that one pest has a disease, it’s not far-fetched to think others may carry the same disease. While mosquitoes can carry insect-borne illnesses, according to the CDC (Center for Disease Control), the answer is no.

There’s currently no evidence that indicates you can get Lyme disease from mosquitoes. Additionally, mosquito bites are typically very brief, whereas ticks must hang onto their host for hours or days to fully transmit Lyme bacteria.

Long-Term Complications of Lyme Disease

As mentioned above, if you don’t address the symptoms of Lyme disease during the initial stages, it can lead to longer-term complications. Even after treatment, some people still experience side effects of the disease, such as:

  • Bodily aches
  • Arthritis in knees and other joints that don’t seem to go away
  • Lethargy

You could also face some neurological effects of Lyme disease that can impact your memory, facial muscles, and the muscles around your neck.

Ways To Protect Yourself From Lyme Disease

Lyme disease can be very debilitating for those infected, but this doesn’t mean you should never venture outside again. There are steps and precautions you can take to mitigate the risks. Follow these simple steps when visiting heavily wooded or sparsely populated areas, especially areas with tall, unkempt grass:

  • Use tick repellants: Spray tick repellant on your clothes and shoes before going to a grassy or wooded area. It’ll keep them away while you’re outdoors.
  • Wear light-colored clothing: Ticks and other pests are attracted to dark colors. Wear lighter colors to reduce the risks and to help someone spot one on you.
  • Dress for protection: Although it might be warm during the summer, you’ll still need to wear the proper clothing when venturing outdoors. Avoid wearing open-toed shoes in areas where ticks may lurk. Also, wear long-sleeved shirts and/or pants for the time you’re outside to avoid a tick latching onto your legs.
  • Hire service professionals: Rather than waiting to find out if you have ticks on your property, be proactive and hire a professional service. A barrier spray treatment provides a protective shield around your property, keeping pests out and away from your family and pets.
  • Check for ticks: Always check for ticks if you’ve been engaging in an outdoor activity. Have someone inspect your clothing or use a mirror to check yourself and areas you cannot easily see.

Protect Yourself From Ticks and Other Annoying Pests

Insects are innovative, adaptable creatures, which explains why they have been in existence for so long. Protecting you, your family, and pets from the dangers of ticks requires a proactive approach. If you enjoy the outdoors, take preventive measures to keep ticks and other pests off your property.

For ultimate peace of mind, call on the professionals at Mosquito Joe®. Our tick control services are developed to protect your property from potentially harmful insects. We offer a range of pest control services. that are all backed by the Neighborly Done Right Promise™, which ensures your satisfaction. You don’t have to spend all your time indoors, because Mosquito Joe is making the outdoor fun again! Request a free quote today!

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Heartworm Disease Awareness Month

As the weather gets more conducive for outdoor activities, it means more barbecues, relaxing by the pool, and enjoying the fresh air! Unfortunately, it also means more interactions with mosquitoes and other biting pests that pose a threat to our family members, two-legged and four-legged alike. One of the fatal diseases pests can spread is heartworm disease. Sadly, this disease affects thousands of pets each year. April is National Heartworm Awareness Month, designed to raise awareness about the deadly threat that heartworm disease represents for our beloved pets.

What Is Heartworm Disease?

Heartworm disease is a serious and potentially fatal affliction. Infected animals can suffer from acute lung disease, cardiac failure, severe organ damage, or die if the disease is left untreated. The most common victims are dogs, cats, ferrets, wolves, coyotes, and foxes. This disease is caused by parasitic worms called Dirofilaria immitis, otherwise known as heartworms.

While dogs, cats, and ferrets are all vulnerable to heartworm disease, it is far more common in dogs and ferrets than in cats. In part, this is due to heartworms reproducing more rapidly in dogs. However, while successful heartworm disease treatments exist for dogs, no treatment is available for cats or ferrets. One study indicates that one-third of cats diagnosed with heartworm disease die or are euthanized soon after diagnosis. Therefore, it’s essential to protect your pets from this deadly disease.

How Do Pets Get Heartworm Disease?

Pets can get heartworms after being bitten by infected mosquitoes.

Heartworms can live in the major organs of an animal’s body, such as the heart, lungs, and connected blood vessels. Adult female heartworms living in an animal host produce microscopic baby worms that circulate throughout the infected animal’s bloodstream. When the host gets bitten by a bloodsucking mosquito, the insect picks up these tiny worms with the animal’s blood. When that pest bites another susceptible pet or wild animal, they deposit the infective worms into the animal’s bloodstream.

Heartworm disease has been diagnosed in all 50 states, but the highest number of reported cases are in the southeast, especially in Gulf Coast areas. Warmer climates make transmission from mosquitoes much easier, and the number of wildlife carriers in the area is also a contributing factor.

Symptoms of Heartworm Disease

Not all infected dogs and cats demonstrate symptoms of heartworm disease. A blood test is the surest way to detect heartworms in your pet. Use Heartworm Disease Month as your motivation to schedule regular vet visits for your pet(s).

The most common symptoms of heartworm disease are the following:

  • A dry, persistent cough, particularly in otherwise healthy-appearing pets
  • Lethargy, poor stamina, and a reluctance to exercise
  • Decreased appetite and weight loss
  • Swollen belly due to fluid buildup in the abdomen
  • Difficulty breathing or shallow, rapid breaths
  • Frequent vomiting, sometimes with blood
  • Bloody diarrhea
  • Nosebleeds
  • Blindness
  • Seizures

If your dog or cat displays any of these symptoms, don’t hesitate to take them to your vet. However, heartworms cannot be detected in your pet until the parasites are about 7 months old.

Stages of Heartworm Disease

There are four distinct stages of heartworm disease, which are as follows:

  1. A mosquito bites a pet or wild animal infected with heartworms, ingesting microfilariae, the immature larval form of Dirofilaria immitis.
  2. The heartworm microfilariae mature into infective larvae inside the mosquito.*
  3. The infected mosquito bites a healthy animal, transmitting the infective heartworm larvae.
  4. The larvae enter the animal’s bloodstream, traveling to the heart and lungs, where they mature and begin to reproduce, growing up to a foot in length.

* Heartworm microfilariae, the microscopic immature larval form, must spend time in the digestive tract of a mosquito to develop into infective larvae. An infected pet cannot pass heartworm to another animal through contact, scratches, bites, or grooming. Mosquitoes are essential to the spread of heartworm disease.

Mature heartworms can live in dogs for five to seven years and in cats for two or three years. (Yuck!) But this long lifespan means that every mosquito season, your pet can develop an increasing number of heartworms, worsening the severity of the heartworm disease and its symptoms.

How To Prevent Heartworm Disease in Dogs?

While Heartworm Disease Awareness Month is dedicated to raising pet owners’ awareness of the disease, prevention is the main purpose. Heartworm disease in dogs and cats can be prevented, so it’s essential to check your pet(s) regularly for symptoms and schedule periodic checkups with your vet.

The best way to deal with the threat of heartworm disease is the regular use of preventative medications prescribed by your vet. Various effective formulas are available in once-monthly chewable form, once-monthly topical applications, and once- or twice-yearly injections.

Effective prevention consists of following your veterinarian’s recommendation and having a proactive plan in place. The American Heartworm Society recommends starting puppies and kittens on a preventative medication as early as the label allows, typically at 8 weeks old. Ferrets should weigh at least two pounds before starting the medication. Experts also recommend that pets aged 7 months and older be tested for heartworms every 12 months. Although cats are less likely to contract heartworms as they are atypical hosts, it is important to provide cats with preventative treatment and test them regularly for early detection.

Additional Protection Against Heartworm Disease

Another component of heartworm disease prevention is effective mosquito control around your property. Remember that mosquitoes are essential to the transmission of heartworm disease. Mosquito Joe®’s barrier-treatment sprays, misting systems, and mosquito traps  provide an added layer of defense and protection against mosquitoes that transmit heartworm disease. With a regular schedule of our barrier treatments, especially during the peak mosquito season, you can protect your family and pets from mosquitoes and the health risks they pose.

You can also lower the mosquito population near your home by doing the following:

  • Emptying standing water sources. Tires, puddles, bird baths, and even children’s toys can be prime breeding grounds for mosquitoes.
  • Cleaning gutters regularly so water doesn’t build up.
  • Cut grass and shrubs short so pests can’t hide.
  • Drilling holes in tires, swings, trash cans, and recycle bins so water drains out.
  • Repairing leaky outdoor faucets and pipes.
  • Keeping your lawn weed-free and avoiding overgrown vegetation.

Treatment of Heartworm Disease

Heartworm disease is treated in dogs with the use of Melarsomine dihydrochloride. This is a drug that contains arsenic and has been approved by the FDA to kill adult heartworms in dogs. It is available under the trade names Immiticide and Diroban. Heartworm disease prevention is far and away the best treatment.

To find more information on heartworms, visit the American Heartworm Society.

Help Protect My Pets from Heartworm Disease

At Mosquito Joe, we’re dedicated to keeping your family and furry friends safe from biting insects. In addition to mosquito control, our services include flea and tick control. We also provide extensive ongoing education about insects and vector-borne diseases to help you protect all of your loved ones.

To keep your outdoor spaces free from itching and swatting, trust the professionals at your local Mosquito Joe. All our work is backed by the Neighborly Done Right Promise™ and the Mosquito Joe® Satisfaction Guarantee. So you know we’ll get the job done right the first time. Request a free quote and say goodbye to biting mosquitoes and hello to the great outdoors.

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How to Get Rid of Allergens and Pests in Your Home



If you suffer from allergies, you are probably aware of the most common allergens circulating inside your home. Well, there are countless other allergens in and around your home that could be causing or worsening your allergies. Common allergens like dust, mold, pollen, dirt, pet dander, pests, stinging insects, mildew, and bacteria can be found almost anywhere in your home. But did you know that seemingly harmless fixtures, features, and habits could also be contributing to the buildup of allergens in your home, making your allergies that much worse?

Although it may take some time and effort on your part, you can reduce the presence of allergens and pests in your home and yard. With some additional effort, you can even minimize the chances of them returning once you’ve gotten rid of them. Here’s are some ways you can start creating an allergy-free home:

Clean Weekly

Regularly cleaning your home is, perhaps, the easiest way to get rid of allergens and pests. If there is mold, bacteria, mildew, pests, dirt, and debris in your house, cleaning your home will ensure they don’t stick around for long. To keep your home free of allergens, try to do the following tasks each week:

  • Wiping down surfaces, including cabinets and counters.
  • Dusting, including ceiling fans, blinds, and furniture.
  • Vacuuming and sweeping.
  • Mopping.
  • Washing your bedding.
  • Doing your laundry.
  • Cleaning bathroom fixtures, including the toilet and sinks.
  • Cleaning frequently used kitchen appliances, such as your stovetop.

Depending on your home and lifestyle, you may need to take care of some of these chores more frequently, and others less. You may also need to add other chores to your list.

Additionally, do your best to stay on top of daily chores, like doing the dishes or spot cleaning, to make your weekly “deep cleans” that much easier.

Don’t neglect chores that need to be done less frequently, such as cleaning your carpets or taking care of your yard. They may not need to be done often, but they do need to be taken care of regularly if you want to get rid of any allergens that have accumulated in your home.

Address Indoor Air Quality

Indoor air quality (IAQ) can have significant effects on your health, including your allergies. Poor IAQ contains common allergens — such as pet dander, dust, mold, pollen, dust mites, and bacteria — that can exacerbate your allergy symptoms.

Not only is removing allergens from your home a major component of ensuring you have high-quality air, but it can also go a long way in relieving your allergies.

Replace HVAC Filters

Before anything else, replace the filters in your HVAC system. The filters catch allergens and other particles, preventing them from recirculating back into your home. Over time, those particles build up and make it more difficult to filter out allergens.

Though it depends on the type of filter you have in your home, it’s best to change them once every month to month-and-a-half if you have allergies. With frequent filter changes, your HVAC system can work as efficiently as possible and help lessen your allergy symptoms.

In addition, consider having your HVAC system and air ducts cleaned periodically. Particles and debris can build up in the rest of the system, making it work less efficiently overall. Cleaning your system and ducts will remove those allergens and prevent them from reentering your home.

Install a Whole-House Filtration System

A whole-house filtration system works in conjunction with your HVAC system to filter your home’s air. Before entering your HVAC system, air first goes through the whole-house filter. Air is then filtered for a second time through your HVAC system.

Whole-house filters are usually outfitted with high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. HEPA filters are rated to remove at least 99.97% of particles from the air. The air that goes through your HVAC system will already be fairly clean, and your second filter can catch any straggling particles left in the air.

Try a Dehumidifier

As the name suggests, a dehumidifier removes moisture from the air, offering you more control over the humidity in your home. If your home has high humidity, it may be the perfect breeding ground for mold and bacteria. Certain pests, like earwigs and cockroaches, thrive in humid conditions.

Dehumidifiers bring in and cool down warm air. The air contracts as it cools, leaving behind condensation. The condensation drips into a collection tank, allowing the cool, dry air to re-circulate through your home. In addition to making a less hospitable environment for allergens, dry and cool air is also more comfortable to breathe.

As far as dehumidifiers go, you have two options: a portable dehumidifier or a whole-house dehumidifier. If only one room in your home is a problem (such as your bathroom), a portable dehumidifier may be enough. If your entire home is humid or you live in a humid area, a whole-house dehumidifier is a better choice.

Ventilate the Bathroom

Bathrooms are one of the most dangerous rooms in your home for allergens and poor air quality. They’re warm and full of moisture — in other words, a paradise for mold, mildew, and bacteria.

Proper ventilation is key to keeping the air clean in your bathroom. A dehumidifier (even a portable one) can do wonders for your bathroom. You should also install a reliable exhaust fan if you don’t already have one. An exhaust fan will expel air from your bathroom, making way for fresh air to come in.

It’s especially important to ventilate the bathroom when you’re doing anything to increase the humidity or temperature of the room, such as taking a shower or bath. Simply opening a window or leaving the door open significantly improves both ventilation and your IAQ.

Keep Pests and Allergens from Coming Inside

In addition to removing allergens from your home, you can take steps to prevent them from entering your home in the first place. Many allergens, pests, and air pollutants originate outdoors, and if you don’t protect your home, it’s all too easy for them to make their way inside.

Deter Bugs

If you haven’t taken steps to clean up your yard, you may be inadvertently attracting bugs to your home. Not only does this increase the chance of allergies, but it can also have more serious health consequences. Certain pests carry dangerous diseases that can have lasting health impacts.

  • Many common outdoor features can attract bugs:
  • Standing water, such as a pond or birdbath, can attract mosquitos.
  • Trash, dirty grills and other food odors can attract flies and ants.
  • Piles of wood can attract termites.
  • Overgrown or untended areas of your yard can attract ticks and fleas.
  • Outdoor lighting can attract many different pests, including moths, stink bugs, and earwigs.
  • Plants in your garden can also attract a variety of pests (and give off allergy-inducing pollen).

Luckily, there are several changes you can make to discourage pests from visiting your yard:

  • Keep your yard, garden, and patio clean.
  • Use lighting that deters bugs, such as yellow or orange light.
  • Encourage pest predators to come to your yard, including birds and bats.
  • Plant pest-repellent plants and herbs in your garden.
  • Use essential oils to deter certain pests, including mosquitos and ticks.
  • Place bug traps around your yard.
  • Use a patio fan to keep air moving in areas where you relax in your yard.
  • Mow your lawn.
  • Install a fire feature, such as a fire pit or tiki torches.
  • Create a dry mulch barrier in your yard.

You won’t be able to keep your yard entirely free of pests and insects, but you can reduce their presence in your yard by making it less hospitable to them.

Apply Pest Treatment

Even with the above changes, it’s far more difficult to control the allergens in your yard than the ones in your home — especially pests. Not only are there different types of pests that come from different sources, but they can be difficult to spot in your yard. It’s far easier to prevent these pests from taking over your yard than it is to exterminate them after they’ve built a nest.

A pest control treatment is one of the only ways to keep allergy-inducing pests away from your home. The type of treatment you need depends on what pests are responsible for your allergies. For instance, if you have allergic reactions to mosquito bites or insect stings, it’s best to look into a mosquito and stinging insect treatments. You should also consider which pests are most common in your area.

Be Mindful of Pets

Your pets can also bring allergens into your home if they go in and out of your house. After spending time outside, your pet could easily carry in pests (such as fleas and ticks), as well as pollen, dirt, and dust. In addition to being bad for your allergies, this can be equally harmful to your pet’s health.

  • Doing the following can help protect both you and your pet’s health:
  • Inspect your pet for pests when they come inside after being outdoors.
  • Brush your pet to remove any debris from their fur before they come inside.
  • Wash your pet’s bedding regularly.
  • Put your pet’s food away when they aren’t eating.
  • Give your pet any preventative and pest-deterring medicine as prescribed by your vet.
  • Avoid letting your pet outdoors at dawn and dusk, when pests and bugs are most active.
  • Bathe and groom your pet thoroughly and regularly.

Again, there’s no way to keep your home and yard entirely free of potential allergens and pests. However, it’s best to be proactive when it comes to keeping your house allergy-free, so you can find relief from your symptoms and live comfortably in your own home.

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How Is West Nile Virus Spread?

What You Need to Know About West Nile Virus Transmission

Is West Nile virus contagious? How is this mosquito-borne disease spread? With mosquito season in full swing, you may be thinking about the risk of West Nile virus and what you can do to keep your family protected. If you are concerned about West Nile virus transmission from person to person, you will be relieved to know that the World Health Organization (WHO) reports no known human-to-human transmissions of the virus through casual contact.

Still concerned? The experts at Mosquito Joe dig a little deeper into the facts about West Nile virus transmission and the steps you can take for virus prevention.

West Nile Virus Transmission Facts

Birds are the natural hosts of West Nile virus, and the virus proliferates in nature through a lifecycle that involves transmission between birds and mosquitoes. Mosquitoes pick up the virus when they feed on an infected bird and the virus is stored in the mosquito’s salivary glands. Infected mosquitoes can then pass the virus to mammals, including humans, when they bite, injecting the host with the virus.

People most at risk for contracting West Nile are those who work outside or participate in outdoor activities. . anyone who lives in an area where West Nile virus has been identified in mosquitoes is at risk.

West Nile Virus Symptoms

According to WHO, 80% of people who become infected with the virus do not experience symptoms. However, in the worst cases, it can lead to a fatal neurological disease. Approximately 20% of infected people develop West Nile fever, which can include the following symptoms:

  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Tiredness
  • Body Aches
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Skin rash
  • Swollen lymph nodes

Symptoms typically begin to show two to six days after being bitten by an infected mosquito, although it can take up to two weeks. Most people who develop symptoms will make a complete recovery, but residual fatigue and weakness can last several weeks following the infection.

West Nile Virus Prevention

Because there are no medications or vaccines to treat West Nile virus, protecting against mosquito bites is the best plan for prevention.

Here are tips for limiting unwanted encounters with mosquitoes when you or your family members are outside:

  • Apply insect repellent anytime you plan to go outside. Repellent products containing DEET and picaridin are effective and provide longer-lasting protection from bites. Insect repellents containing coconut oil compounds are effective botanical alternatives.
  • Wear long sleeves and pants.
  • Avoid going outside during dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most prevalent.
  • Decrease the number of mosquitoes around your property by emptying standing water from containers and ensuring the yard does not have piles of leaves or debris.
  • Consider the professional application of yard treatments specifically designed to keep mosquitoes and other pests off your property.

Achieve an Itch-Free Yard with Mosquito Joe

A highly effective way to protect your yard from mosquitoes carrying West Nile virus is to have outdoor pest control experts like Mosquito Joe apply recurring barrier treatments to your property. Regular treatments will eliminate mosquitoes and other pests like ticks and fleas for up to three weeks at a time. Your local Mosquito Joe team has the tools and solutions to make your outdoor space fun again so you and your family can enjoy bite-free time in your yard this year.

Let our professionals perform the customized mosquito control services to fit your property’s needs. Give us a call at 1-855-275-2563 for more information or request a free quote online now.


Worried about other viruses that might make their way into your life? Consider these tips from Molly Maid for how to stop spreading germs at work. Molly Maid is a fellow member of the Neighborly® family of home service brands.

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Will Giant Asian Hornets Take a Sting Out of Your Outside Fun?

 

If you’ve heard about The Murder Hornet, you probably are wondering what this insect is and if it could establish itself in the United States. As the experts in outdoor pest control, Mosquito Joe is here to answer all of the important questions you might have.

What is a Murder Hornet?

The Murder Hornet, commonly known as the Giant Asian Hornet, is one of the largest hornets in the world. With a body length of 1.98 inches and a stinger that is one-fourth of an inch, their stinger injects a large amount of venom into an insect.

Giant Asian Hornets are found in temperate to tropical regions in East Asia, South Asia and mainland Southeast Asia. They primarily feed on tree sap, larger insects and social insects such as honeybees and the honey they produce.

The Giant Asian Hornet in the United States

In September 2019, a colony was confirmed in Vancouver, Canada and was eradicated. Recently, there was a sighting of two Giant Asian Hornets in Washington state, one of them being dead. After further investigation of the other insect, it was determined that there was no evidence of an established colony here in the United States.

The biggest threat that the Giant Asian Hornet could impose is the destruction of honeybee hives. Floyd Shockley, the entomology collections manager at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, stated, “It’s important to focus on the facts, and the facts don’t support that this is an established invasive that’s going to destroy the North American honeybee industry.”

When it comes to Giant Asian Hornets and their threat to humans, Shockley also stated that there is nothing to worry about. While their sting is more painful than that of a honeybee, they tend to keep to themselves and are only dangerous when they feel provoked.

Mosquito Joe’s Pollinator Protection Management Program

Mosquito Joe understands that pollinators are a valuable part of the ecosystem, which is why we created the Pollinator Protection Program. Our Pollinator Protection Program is our conscious effort to minimize the harm done to our buzzing friend, the bee, while knocking out our pesky foe, the mosquito. The program is designed around three key areas:

  1. Familiarity with customer property: A trained and certified technician will identify any flowering bushes, gardens and plants that attract pollinators and treat accordingly.
  2. Application procedures: Technicians are trained to not spray within ten feet of plants that attract pollinators. Wind direction is also considered when spraying and may necessitate a greater standoff distance than ten feet.
  3. Products: While pesticides are a potential factor to the pollinators, the concern is largely with neonicotinoids, a family of pesticides which we do not use. We also closely follow the manufacturer’s application instructions on the product label.

We pride ourselves on our communication with our customers, starting with education and then working together when we customize our treatment plan for each individual property.

Need To Treat That Sting?

Mosquito Joe has a treatment program to eradicate non-pollinator stinging insects such as wasps, hornets and ground-nesting yellow jackets. Wearing Personal Protection equipment, our technicians use an insecticidal dust formulation that is injected into the nest with a controlled device to eradicate the nest.

Are you ready to take back your yard? Reach out to your local Mosquito Joe to find a treatment plan that works best for your property.

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