Home Remedies for Mosquito Bites

Some of the most exciting moments of the summer occur outdoors. Between sports, backyard barbecues, and sunbathing, there’s never a shortage of things to do! One of the most annoying things about enjoying the outdoors are mosquito bites. Who wants to spend the first few innings of their baseball game swatting? And nothing ruins an outdoor wedding like taking your eyes away from the bride and groom to relieve the itch from a bite. We know how awful mosquito bites can be, so here’s some information on how you and your family can ditch the itch this summer.

Why do mosquito bites itch so much?

Mosquito bites appear when a female mosquito draws blood from a host. (Fun fact: Only female mosquitoes bite!) These bites can appear as small read bumps on the skin or as larger swollen areas. When mosquitoes draw blood, a protein is released into the blood system, causing general irritation of the skin and of course, itching.

We all know the automatic reaction to a mosquito bite is to scratch, however, this can lead to further irritation as scratching can damage the skin and lead to infection. So, what can you do? Here are some DIY remedies you can use:

One of the simplest ways to alleviate the itch of a mosquito bite is to apply a cold compress to the affected area. A small bag of ice can help reduce swelling and redness as well as temporarily soothe any itching. If you don’t have ice, a bag of frozen peas is a great alternative. Don’t worry, we’re not judging!

If you frequently get sunburned, you likely have the next ingredient in your cabinet. Aloe vera is a great, natural anti-septic that can help ease the pain of mosquito bites. You can use aloe vera gel which is available in most supermarkets or, you can get an aloe vera plant and scoop out the fresh gel. Another method is to remove the gel from the plant, blend until it reaches a smooth consistency, pour into an ice tray, and freeze. This makes for an easy application with less mess and a satisfying cooling sensation.

Another remedy that you may have at home is honey. While it’s most famous for being a natural sweetener, honey also has a number of antibiotic properties that can help combat irritation from mosquito bites. Using this ingredient, you can get rid of the itch fast and protect the area from infection.

Typically used in skincare, witch hazel is another household item that can be beneficial for fighting the itch of mosquito bites. Because it is an astringent, witch hazel helps lessen the irritation at the location of the bite.

Using essential oils to treat mosquito bites is a trendier solution. Natural oils such as lavender and tea tree oil help take out the sting and unpleasantness of mosquito bites, not to mention the added benefit of making you smell amazing. Be mindful when using essential oils, as a little goes a long way! You only need a drop or two diluted with a carrier oil (such as jojoba or coconut) or water to do the trick. Using too much can result in further skin irritation. To make this solution a little more convenient, you can create your own essential oil roller!

The most common ways to combat mosquito bites are applying common over-the-counter items such as hydrocortisone or calamine lotion. Both of these medicated creams help to relieve itchiness on contact and provide relief almost instantly.

The best way to protect yourself from mosquito bites is to make sure that your outdoor spaces have been treated by Mosquito Joe! Don’t let mosquito bites ruin your summer. Call Mosquito Joe today to ensure that you can enjoy your backyard without worrying about bites from mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas.

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Don’t let a tick make you sick | Lyme Disease Awareness Month

With the April showers behind us and May flowers starting to bloom, warm weather is finally here! With warmer weather brings more outdoor activities, as well as the possibility of a tick bite. May is National Lyme Disease Awareness Month and Mosquito Joe is joining the fight to protect families and furry friends from this tick-borne illness.

What is Lyme Disease?

Lyme disease was first detected in 1976 in Lyme, Connecticut and most commonly occurs in the Northeast, upper Midwest and mid-Atlantic regions. It is estimated that about 300,000 people are diagnosed each year.  Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks. In most cases, the tick must be attached for 36 to 48 hours or more before the Lyme disease bacterium can be transmitted.

Signs and Symptoms

Early symptoms of Lyme disease usually begin from 3 to 30 days after being bitten by an infected tick. The most common early stage symptom is a rash where the tick was attached. This rash starts as a small red area that spreads outward to look like a bullseye. One may also experience flu-like symptoms, such as headache, fever, sore and aching muscles and joints, stiff neck, fatigue and swollen glands.

If you experience any of the following symptoms and have had a tick bite, it is important to seek medical attention. Untreated Lyme disease can produce a wide range of symptoms, depending on the stage of infection. Some of these symptoms may include fever, facial paralysis and arthritis.

Treatment

If you develop any of the above symptoms within several weeks of removing a tick, it’s important that you see your healthcare provider. When Lyme disease is diagnosed in the early stages, people usually recover rapidly and completely. In order to be treated, you will be given antibiotics by your healthcare provider, which most commonly are doxycycline, amoxicillin or cefuroxime axetil.

However, you can get Lyme disease again if you are bitten by another infected tick, so it is important to protect yourself from tick bites.

mosquito joe lyme disease

Preventing Tick Bites

Although it’s not possible to completely protect yourself from getting a tick bite, there are steps you can take to reduce your chances. Tick activity is higher during the warmer months, but ticks can be out anytime the temperature is about 45 degrees Fahrenheit. With the help from Mosquito Joe, you can get ahead of any tick problems you might have this season, while also implementing the following habits:

  • Keep grass short and underbrush thinned at your home.
  • Move wood piles away from the home.
  • Wear light-colored clothes to help you spot ticks easily.
  • Check your body for ticks and shower within two hours of being outdoors.
  • Move swing sets, sandboxes and other play areas to avoid tick bites.
  • Keep pets out of thickly wooded areas where tick activity is high and talk to your veterinarian about tick control options.
  • Let Mosquito Joe be your second line of deference for these intruders by getting a barrier spray that rids your yards for mosquitoes, fleas and ticks.

When you come in from the outdoors, always do a thorough check on yourself, your family and your pets. When doing a tick check, remember that ticks liked places that are warm, so make sure you check the back of your armpits, scalp, back of the neck and behind the ears.

But what if I do get a tick bite?

If you do find a tick on you or your family, there’s no need to panic! The key is to remove the tick as soon as possible. There are several tick removal devices on the market, but fine-tipped tweezers also work great. Follow the below steps on removing a tick:

  1. Use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin’s surface as possible.
  2. Pull upward with steady, even pressure. Don’t twist or jerk the tick; this can cause the mouth-parts to break off and remain in the skin. If this does happen, remove the mouth-parts with tweezers. If you are unable to do so, leave it alone and let the skin heal.
  3. After removing the tick, thoroughly clean the bite area and your hands with rubbing alcohol or soap and water.
  4. Never crush a tick with your fingers. Dispose of a live tick by putting it in alcohol, placing it in a sealed bag/container, wrapping it tightly in tape, or flushing it down the toilet.removal of tick

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/ticks/removing_a_tick.html

Don’t be ticked off this summer

Let Mosquito Joe be another line of defense against tick-borne illnesses by applying a barrier treatment to your property. A trained and certified technician will treat your yard with an effective solution that eliminates mosquitoes, ticks and fleas for 21 days. As an alternative to our longer-lasting synthetic treatment, our all-natural solution repels mosquitoes immediately. This less-adhesive yet effective option requires treatment on a 14-day cycle.

If you’re still not sure if Mosquito Joe is right for you, give your local MoJo a call or request a free quote online. We are dedicated to making outside fun again for you and your family and our job is not done until you are happy!

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Tick Tips – What You Need To Know

 

With increasing evidence that ticks are capable of withstanding cold temperatures, these pests are becoming a year-round problem. Therefore, understanding the risks ticks pose and the best strategies to remove them are of great importance, even in the fall and winter months.

How to Prevent Against Tick Bites

  • Know where ticks hide. Ticks live in tall grass and wooded areas. Hunting, gardening or spending time in your backyard are all activities where you, your family and your pets could pick up ticks.
  • Dress to avoid ticks. Wearing long sleeves and long pants, tucking socks into boots and wearing light colored clothing can help prevent tick bites.
  • Utilize Mosquito Joe barrier treatments as an added layer of defense. Regular barrier treatments from Mosquito Joe eliminate ticks and give you and your family peace of mind.

Tick Prevention Techniques

How to Check for Ticks

Ticks can be as small as the tip of a pencil. Because they like to hide in warm places, they’re usually hidden and are difficult to find. Check these places once coming back indoors to ensure you don’t have any lingering ticks.

  • Under the arms
  • In and around ears
  • Inside belly button
  • Back of the knees
  • In and around hair
  • Between legs
  • Around the waist

Be sure to inspect outside gear and pets for ticks that could have latched on while outside. Additionally, throw clothing in the dryer for 10 minutes to remove ticks. Taking a shower within two hours of being outdoors helps wash off unattached ticks and decreases the chance of contracting tick-borne disease.

How to Properly Remove a Tick

  1. Don’t panic! Grab a pair of tweezers with a fine tip. This will be the best tool to remove the small insect.
  2. Pull upward using steady, even pressure. Using this motion will ensure that the mouth-parts of the tick don’t break off and remain in the skin. If this does happen, use the fine-tipped tweezers to remove the mouth-parts.
  3. Clean the bite. Use rubbing alcohol or soap and water to clean your hands, the infected area and your tweezers.
  4. Dispose of the tick. Place the tick in alcohol, put it in a sealed container, wrap it in tape or flush it down the toilet. Don’t crush the tick between your fingers as it could still transmit disease.
  5. Following up: check on the bite. If you develop a rash, fever or any of the other symptoms associated with tick-borne disease, seek medical assistance. Tell your doctor about your recent tick bite, when the bite occurred and where you acquired the bite.

Know the Symptoms of Tick-borne Illness

There are numerous diseases that are caused by ticks. Knowing what types of ticks are prevalent in your area can help you better understand the risks of certain diseases. Fever, chills, aches and pains are common across most tick-borne illnesses. However, many of the diseases have different and distinctive rashes. Knowing what to look for could help you identify early signs of Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, southern tick-associated rash illness (STARI) or tularemia.

To add an added layer of defense against your outdoor space, contact your local Mosquito Joe today to enjoy a bite-free yard! We have special services that add against ticks and other pests, so let us help you protect yourself and your family throughout the year.

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Celebrities Living with Lyme Disease

 

Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne disease in United States. There are over 30,000 cases of the tick-borne illness reported each year. Among those are celebrities we frequently see on TV or on magazine covers; others are sports icons and some are Grammy award winners.

 Members of the Hadid Family

Yolanda Hadid, of The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills fame, has been vocal about her battle with Lyme disease. Yolanda has published a book chronicling her experience living with the illness entitled “Believe Me: My Battle with the Invisible Disability of Lyme Disease.” Recently, the former model admitted after nearly a year of remission, her symptoms have returned. At the Global Lyme Alliance,Yolanda said she realizes “the higher purpose of [her] journey is to continue to bring awareness to this awful disease until the change is made.” Her children, Bella and Anwar Hadid, also have the chronic illness.

Shania Twain

The country singer opened up about her struggle with Lyme disease in July 2018, stating she suffered from dysphonia which affected her vocal cords. The disease kept her from touring and even singing. “I never thought I would sing again,” Twain said. Thanks to physical therapy and vocal training, Twain has released a new album and resumed touring.

Alec Baldwin

Nearly 18 years ago, the actor was bitten by an infected tick. The result was numerous bouts of severe Lyme disease symptoms. Because of his struggle, Baldwin is vigilant in checking his children for ticks after they’ve been outdoors. “I want my kids to grow up riding horses and bikes and enjoying themselves every day and not have to spend every day with us going over them with a magnifying glass to make sure they don’t have any ticks on their body or their dogs, but that is part of the lifestyle of where I live,” he said.

Avril Lavigne

In a letter to fans, Lavigne revealed she had been fighting Lyme disease. The singer started The Avril Lavigne Foundation in 2010 to support causes such as Race to Erase MS, Special Olympics and UNICEF, in addition to Lyme disease. In October 2018, Lavigne joined the Board of Directors for the Global Lyme Alliance. Her most recent album, “Head Above Water,” addresses her battle with the chronic disease. “This is me and my fight. This album tells my story,” Lavigne said.

Kris Kristofferson

Kristofferson’s doctors originally told him his deteriorating memory was due to Alzheimer’s disease. After many years of strenuous testing, it was clear the singer had been misdiagnosed; after a positive test for Lyme disease, his symptoms were correctly identified. With the proper treatment, Kristofferson’s condition improved. A friend said of the iconic artist, “Kris is as sharp as he’s been in the past 20 years because of his treatments.”

Tom Seaver

In 1991, the former New York Mets pitcher was diagnosed with Lyme disease. At the time, “Tom Terrific” lived in Greenwich, CT and spent the majority of his time outdoors, which is how he contracted the illness. The Baseball Hall of Fame member described the disease’s symptoms as “the worst case of the flu every day.”

The symptoms of those suffering from Lyme disease are different but the cause of the illness is the same: infected ticks. These celebrities give visibility to Lyme disease and advocate for treatment and a cure. Visit Mosquito Joe online to learn more about Lyme disease and our available treatment options that provide a layer of defense against ticks to your yard.

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Beat the Bloodsuckers: Mosquito Control Awareness Week 2018

 

Each year Mosquito Joe recognizes the importance of Mosquito Control Awareness Week through our Beat the Bloodsuckers campaign. Our goal is to raise awareness in the communities in which we operate about the importance of mosquito control and the amazing work of non-profits like blood banks and Nothing But Nets. Although this week falls during one of our busiest months of the year, it does not stop our passionate franchisees from giving back in their communities. This year, National Mosquito Control Awareness Week(MCAW), recognized by the American Mosquito Control Association, fell on June 24th – June 30th, and it was a memorable week for Mosquito Joe.

Mosquitoes date back to over 100 million years, which means they’re not going anywhere anytime soon so it’s important to protect your families and furry friends. Not only are they nuisances who ruin your outdoor fun, but they can transmit dangerous diseases such as Zika, West Nile Virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE). The diseases mosquitoes carry make them one of the deadliest creatures on earth, responsible for over 1 million deaths every year. Luckily, here in the U.S. we’re able to combat these pesky bugs with a professional mosquito control service like Mosquito Joe. Our franchisees are dedicated to spreading awareness about mosquitoes and the illnesses they cause as well as working to fight off mosquito populations in their local areas. MCAW brings professional mosquito control to light and we’re thankful for this opportunity to give back.

Beat The Bloodsuckers

This is Mosquito Joe’s sixth year participating in our Beat the Bloodsuckers campaign. Franchisees had the opportunity to partner with a local blood bank in their area or with our philanthropic partner, Nothing But Nets. Mosquito Joe locations across the country joined with local blood banks donating 10% of new customer sales from that week to their blood bank of choice. This year we were able to donate over $7,000 and partner with 26 blood banks!

For the second year in a row, Mosquito Joe partnered with Nothing But Nets, a global grassroots campaign that was established in 2006. Since then, they’ve raised over $65 million to help deliver 12 million bed nets to families in need, along with other crucial malaria interventions like diagnostic treatments and training of healthcare workers. A mosquito net sent to someone in need is just $10; for every new Mosquito Joe customer signed during MCAW, a net was sent! This year our company raised over $24,000, sending 2,413 life-saving nets during Mosquito Control Awareness Week to those in need!

Mosquito Control Awareness Week 2018

The Buzz!

Our amazing franchisees were out there rocking it in their local communities to spread awareness around the importance of mosquito control. Mosquito Joe locations were featured 131 times across the U.S. and secured 14 TV segments in just one week. We’re excited so many franchisees were able to further educate their communities on mosquito control, and how important it really is to keep our families and furry friends itch-free! Check out a few highlights below:

We’re very proud of our franchisees and so happy we were able to give back to these non-profit organizations by supporting the amazing work that they do through our 2018 Beat the Bloodsuckers campaign. Mosquito Joe continues to partner with Nothing But Nets through our ongoing MoJo Bites Back campaign. To support us in our mission, consider donating to our MoJo Bites Back campaign as we raise funds for malaria and bring awareness to malaria-stricken areas. It will only cost you $10 to send a net; make a difference for a family in need today

Thanks to our participating franchisees, each blood bank that we partnered with, Nothing But Nets, and our AMAZING customers that helped make this year’s Beat the Bloodsuckers campaign the huge success that it was.

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