Do Mosquitoes Spread Coronavirus?

This answer is…absolutely not.

While there are a lot of diseases spread by mosquitoes, according to World Health Organization has stated, “There has been no information nor evidence to suggest that the new coronavirus could be transmitted by mosquitoes.”

How Does COVID-19 Spread?

COVID-19

The outbreak of COVID-19 is being spread from person to person. Based on what we know, its spread occurs between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet). Respiratory droplets are produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes, and those droplets carry the virus from one person to another.

How Do I Protect Myself and My Family?

This pandemic is moving quickly, and the best practices can change from day-to-day. Follow the preventative steps recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and your local health department, as some information will change based on how serious the outbreak is in your area.

To help you stay healthy and safe, we’ve outlined some of the most effective preventative measures below.

Social Distancing

Limiting contact with people outside your home is an important step in protecting yourself and your family. Social distancing means taking measures to maintain distance from other humans, therefore limiting the chances of them infecting you with COVID-19. The easiest way to distance yourself is to stay at home as much as possible.

If you must leave the house, take the following steps to distance yourself while outside the home:

  • Stay at least six feet away from other people as much as possible.
  • Replace handshakes or hugs with elbow bumps.
  • If you touch door handles or handrails, do not touch your face; wash your hands as soon as possible.
  • If you are sick, stay home and avoid contact with others.
  • If you are healthy, avoid contact with people who are sick.

Personal Hygiene

It cannot be said enough that handwashing and keeping your hands away from your face are vital steps in protecting yourself and others. Consider the following recommendations from the CDC:

  • Wash your hands often. Use soap and hot water and wash for at least 20 seconds, especially after being out in public, blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing. Use hand sanitizer only when soap and water are not accessible and ensure it contains at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your face. If your hands are dirty, keep them away from your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Contain coughs and sneezes. Cover your mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze and throw used tissues in the trash immediately. If you’re not able to use a tissue, cough or sneeze into your elbow, not your hands.
  • Wear a facemask if you are sick. Healthy individuals who are not caring for sick people do not need to wear masks. It’s important to make sure masks are available for those who need them.
  • Clean and disinfect. Both clean and disinfect surfaces that are touched regularly every day. This includes things like tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets and sinks.

While COVID-19 is already impacting life in America on a significant level, taking the necessary precautions to limit its spread is the best thing we can do to protect both ourselves and our communities.

Mosquitoes Do Carry Many Diseases

While mosquitoes are not of concern with the outbreak of COVID-19, they are carriers of many diseases that can have serious impacts on those who contract the diseases. If you’re concerned about mosquitoes in your yard, Mosquito Joe provides treatments to help eliminate mosquitoes from your property. Give us a call at 1-855-275-2563 or request a quote online.

Learn how to reduce spreading of germs in your office with these tips from Molly Maid, another member of the Neighborly® family of home service brands.

The information provided herein is interim guidance for general education purposes only and should not be construed as or substituted for medical advice or emergency response plans. For additional information, please contact your local health department or visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html. All Mosquito Joe services are performed by independently owned and operated franchises.

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How Many Mosquitoes Are There in the World?

How Many Mosquitoes Are in the World?

It’s impossible to accurately tabulate the number of mosquitoes in the world. The adult lives of mosquitoes are brief, rarely lasting more than 15 days. And female mosquitoes lay a clutch of 100-200 eggs every three days, laying as many as three sets of eggs before dying. With such a rapid reproduction cycle, the number of mosquitoes in our world is changing every second.
However, across the globe there are 3,500 different species of mosquito. These species are subdivided into 112 genus-species with the main distinction being preferred breeding habitat

How Many Species of Mosquitoes Are There in the World?

There are approximately 3,500 species of mosquitoes worldwide with around 175 residing in the United States. Most of the mosquitoes found within the United States fall into three genera: Aedes, Anopheles, or Culex genus.

Aedes
These mosquitoes can be identified by their narrow black bodies and legs with alternating bands of light and dark. They were originally found in the tropics but have spread throughout the world and are now found on all continents except Antarctica. Aedes mosquitoes are responsible for the spread of dengue fever.

Anopheles
Mosquitoes in this genus are the main transmitters of malaria throughout the world, though the species that live in the United States do not transmit malaria. 460 different species of mosquitoes have been identified within this genus, but not all of them are able to transmit disease.

Culex
Culex are often thought of as the common house mosquito, but are responsible for transmitting a number of diseases including West Nile Virus and encephalitis. In the United States, this mosquito can be found throughout the Southeast states.

While the total number of mosquitoes there are in the world is impossible to quantify, we do have an idea of the number of types and species. With 3,500 species worldwide, that’s certainly a lot of mosquitoes.

How Many Mosquitoes Are in Your Backyard?

To give you an idea of how hard it would be to determine a world population of mosquitoes, have you ever tried to count the mosquitoes flitting around your backyard? We’re willing to bet you haven’t. We’re also willing to bet that the thought of doing so is daunting. To get close enough to count them would surely requite sacrificing yourself to an uncomfortable excess of bites.

If it starts to feel like every mosquito is targeting your backyard, give your local Mosquito Joe a call or request a free quote and make the first step toward a mosquito-free yard!

Homes can have a variety of pests inside, learn how to eliminate indoor pests, too, from the clean home professionals at Molly Maid, a trusted fellow Neighborly® brand.

 

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Know the Facts | Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus

What is Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus?

Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus (EEEV or Triple E) is a mosquito-borne disease that is spread through mosquitoes who have bitten an infected bird. The primary EEEV vector is a swamp mosquito called the black-tailed mosquito which transmits the virus to birds, or becomes infected by feeding on infected birds in their swampland habitat. When a mosquito that typically feeds on humans feeds on the infected bird instead, they then contract EEEV. That mosquito then transmits the illness to horses and humans through an additional bite.

What should I know about EEEV?

While the probability of getting EEEV is low, it is still important to be aware of the symptoms and importance of protecting yourself, however infrequent the cases are. Human EEEV cases occur so infrequently because the primary transmission cycle takes place in and around swampy areas where human populations tend to be limited. If you are someone who works outdoors or engages in recreational activities in endemic areas, it’s especially important to be aware of the virus. Although anyone can contract the disease, those under the age of 15 and over 50 are at a higher risk of a severe case of EEEV.

What should I know about Triple E in 2019?

In the United States, few human cases are reported each year. According to the CDC, in 2018, only 6 human cases were reported nationwide. However, 2019 has seen a rise in the number of human cases totaling to over 30 confirmed or suspected cases in seven states: Michigan, Tennessee, North Carolina, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut and New Jersey. The CDC has provided a comprehensive map of confirmed cases by state from 2010-2019, as well as updating the map whenever new cases are confirmed. You can also view confirmed cases for other mosquito-borne illnesses such as West Nile Virus, Zika and Dengue fever.

What are the symptoms?

The CDC notes that there are two forms of EEEV: systemic or encephalitic. Systemic infection has an abrupt onset and can result in fever and chills. The illness lasts one to two weeks and recovery is complete when there is no central nervous system involvement. The encephalitic form starts as systemic but will manifest into more serious symptoms, such as fever, headache, irritability and in some cases brain damage. It usually takes between four and 10 days after being bitten to notice symptoms. If you or anyone you know starts to show any symptoms it is important to contact your healthcare provider to determine the best course of treatment.

How is EEEV treated?

While the disease can be prevented in horses with the use of vaccinations, there is no preventative or cure for EEEV available for humans. According to the CDC, “Patients with suspected EEE should be evaluated by a healthcare provider, appropriate serologic and other diagnostic tests ordered and supportive treatment provided.”

What can I do to prevent mosquito-borne illnesses?

technician sprayingThe best prevention against Eastern Equine Encephalitis is a reduction of mosquito populations and the avoidance of mosquito bites. Professional mosquito control services such as the barrier treatment offered by Mosquito Joe® provides the best defense against mosquito-borne illnesses like EEEV. Additionally, eliminating breeding areas on your property keeps mosquitoes from producing and reduces the risk of getting sick from a mosquito bite. To help reduce the population on your property, consider the following:

  • Unblock drains and gutters
  • Have fans in outdoor spaces to eliminate mosquitoes from flying close by
  • Avoid allowing standing water to accumulate in outdoor containers such as flowerpots, tires, dog bowls, etc.
  • Screen windows and doors
  • Use mosquito repellant and wear protective clothing (long  sleeves and long pants)
  • Let Mosquito Joe be your second line of defense by getting a barrier treatment that protects your yard from mosquitoes, ticks and fleas

At Mosquito Joe, we take our job of keeping your yard itch-free seriously.  With our licensed technicians and a passion for making outside fun again, our job is not done until you and your family are happy. To add an added layer of defense against mosquitoes in your outdoor spaces, contact your local Mosquito Joe today to enjoy a bite-free yard!

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Lyme Disease in Pets

Mosquito Joe provides mosquito, tick and flea control treatment to residential and commercial customers across the country. We ensure outside is fun again for our customers’ families and pets by eliminating swatting and scratching. We can all agree that our four-legged friends are near and dear to our hearts so we want to make sure they can enjoy the backyard with their favorite humans without avoiding any health risks or concerns. While we certainly make customers’ yards itch-free with our mosquito barrier treatment, this same service also effectively rids the property of ticks and fleas. This is important for our furry friends as ticks carry Lyme disease, the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the United States.

Transmitted through tick bites, the disease can be difficult to detect and can cause serious and recurring health problems for our pets. Deer ticks, carriers of Lyme disease, are found in forests or grassy, wooded, marshy areas near rivers, lakes or oceans. People or animals may be bitten by deer ticks during outdoor activities such as hiking, camping or while spending time in their backyards. It’s best to be proactive in preventing infection by taking appropriate measures to prevent tick bites, and for dogs, that means vaccinating against the disease. Always remember to ask your local veterinarians office to establish a monthly treatment program.

How to Prevent Lyme Disease

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, “The best way to protect pets from Lyme disease is to take preventive measures to reduce the chance of contracting the disease. Even during the last few weeks of summer, it’s important to remember that pets and people are at greater risk of being infected with Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases such as anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis, or Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.” Here are a few additional tips to prevent ticks in your backyard:

  • Avoid wooded and tall grassy areas where tick activity is high.
  • Keep your grass cut short and bushes and trees trimmed.
  • Remove wood piles from the home.
  • Move swing sets, sandboxes and other play areas away from wooded areas.
  • Upon returning inside your home after enjoying time outdoors, always check yourself, your children and your pets for ticks. Wash clothing immediately.
  • Use tick-preventative products – check with your veterinarian to find the right products for your pets.
  • Protect your property with a Mosquito Joe barrier treatment so your furry friends can roam your yard worry-free. Our long-lasting treatment works up to 21 days and protects your family and pets from mosquitoes, ticks and fleas.

Symptom in Pets

Once in the bloodstream, the bacteria can travel to different parts of the body and cause problems in specific organs or locations, such as joints, as well as overall illness. Other symptoms include:

  • Fever
  • Loss of appetite
  • Reduced energy
  • Stiffness, discomfort or pain
  • Swelling of joints

If you see that your dog is experiencing any of these symptoms, it is important to take them to the veterinarian so they can be tested and treated for Lyme disease.

How are Dogs Tested and Treated?

Once you arrive at the veterinarian, you will need to give a thorough history of your dog’s health and any symptoms they are having. Your veterinarian will run the necessary tests to determine what illness your pet has.  According to the American Kennel Club, “The two blood tests used for Lyme disease testing are called C6 and Quant C6, which can both be performed by your local veterinarian’s office. The C6 antibodies can be detected three to five weeks after an infected tick bites your pet. The next step would be the Quant C6, along with urinalysis to help determine if antibiotics are necessary.”

If the diagnosis is Lyme disease, your dog will be treated as an outpatient and given antibiotics for at least four weeks.

Did you know that ticks will arrive before mosquitoes and hang around after the mosquitoes are gone? Ticks arrive once ground temperature is above 45 degrees Fahrenheit, so it’s important to have a plan in place in advance, and to follow through during the fall.  Mosquito Joe ensures families and their pets are protected from mosquitoes, ticks and fleas. Don’t get ticked off this year – give your local office a call today to get on the schedule.

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Home Remedies for Mosquito Bites

Some of the most exciting moments of the summer occur outdoors. Between sports, backyard barbecues, and sunbathing, there’s never a shortage of things to do! One of the most annoying things about enjoying the outdoors are mosquito bites. Who wants to spend the first few innings of their baseball game swatting? And nothing ruins an outdoor wedding like taking your eyes away from the bride and groom to relieve the itch from a bite. We know how awful mosquito bites can be, so here’s some information on how you and your family can ditch the itch this summer.

Why do mosquito bites itch so much?

Mosquito bites appear when a female mosquito draws blood from a host. (Fun fact: Only female mosquitoes bite!) These bites can appear as small read bumps on the skin or as larger swollen areas. When mosquitoes draw blood, a protein is released into the blood system, causing general irritation of the skin and of course, itching.

We all know the automatic reaction to a mosquito bite is to scratch, however, this can lead to further irritation as scratching can damage the skin and lead to infection. So, what can you do? Here are some DIY remedies you can use:

One of the simplest ways to alleviate the itch of a mosquito bite is to apply a cold compress to the affected area. A small bag of ice can help reduce swelling and redness as well as temporarily soothe any itching. If you don’t have ice, a bag of frozen peas is a great alternative. Don’t worry, we’re not judging!

If you frequently get sunburned, you likely have the next ingredient in your cabinet. Aloe vera is a great, natural anti-septic that can help ease the pain of mosquito bites. You can use aloe vera gel which is available in most supermarkets or, you can get an aloe vera plant and scoop out the fresh gel. Another method is to remove the gel from the plant, blend until it reaches a smooth consistency, pour into an ice tray, and freeze. This makes for an easy application with less mess and a satisfying cooling sensation.

Another remedy that you may have at home is honey. While it’s most famous for being a natural sweetener, honey also has a number of antibiotic properties that can help combat irritation from mosquito bites. Using this ingredient, you can get rid of the itch fast and protect the area from infection.

Typically used in skincare, witch hazel is another household item that can be beneficial for fighting the itch of mosquito bites. Because it is an astringent, witch hazel helps lessen the irritation at the location of the bite.

Using essential oils to treat mosquito bites is a trendier solution. Natural oils such as lavender and tea tree oil help take out the sting and unpleasantness of mosquito bites, not to mention the added benefit of making you smell amazing. Be mindful when using essential oils, as a little goes a long way! You only need a drop or two diluted with a carrier oil (such as jojoba or coconut) or water to do the trick. Using too much can result in further skin irritation. To make this solution a little more convenient, you can create your own essential oil roller!

The most common ways to combat mosquito bites are applying common over-the-counter items such as hydrocortisone or calamine lotion. Both of these medicated creams help to relieve itchiness on contact and provide relief almost instantly.

The best way to protect yourself from mosquito bites is to make sure that your outdoor spaces have been treated by Mosquito Joe! Don’t let mosquito bites ruin your summer. Call Mosquito Joe today to ensure that you can enjoy your backyard without worrying about bites from mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas.

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