Beat the Bloodsuckers: Mosquito Control Awareness Week 2018

 

Each year Mosquito Joe recognizes the importance of Mosquito Control Awareness Week through our Beat the Bloodsuckers campaign. Our goal is to raise awareness in the communities in which we operate about the importance of mosquito control and the amazing work of non-profits like blood banks and Nothing But Nets. Although this week falls during one of our busiest months of the year, it does not stop our passionate franchisees from giving back in their communities. This year, National Mosquito Control Awareness Week(MCAW), recognized by the American Mosquito Control Association, fell on June 24th – June 30th, and it was a memorable week for Mosquito Joe.

Mosquitoes date back to over 100 million years, which means they’re not going anywhere anytime soon so it’s important to protect your families and furry friends. Not only are they nuisances who ruin your outdoor fun, but they can transmit dangerous diseases such as Zika, West Nile Virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE). The diseases mosquitoes carry make them one of the deadliest creatures on earth, responsible for over 1 million deaths every year. Luckily, here in the U.S. we’re able to combat these pesky bugs with a professional mosquito control service like Mosquito Joe. Our franchisees are dedicated to spreading awareness about mosquitoes and the illnesses they cause as well as working to fight off mosquito populations in their local areas. MCAW brings professional mosquito control to light and we’re thankful for this opportunity to give back.

Beat The Bloodsuckers

This is Mosquito Joe’s sixth year participating in our Beat the Bloodsuckers campaign. Franchisees had the opportunity to partner with a local blood bank in their area or with our philanthropic partner, Nothing But Nets. Mosquito Joe locations across the country joined with local blood banks donating 10% of new customer sales from that week to their blood bank of choice. This year we were able to donate over $7,000 and partner with 26 blood banks!

For the second year in a row, Mosquito Joe partnered with Nothing But Nets, a global grassroots campaign that was established in 2006. Since then, they’ve raised over $65 million to help deliver 12 million bed nets to families in need, along with other crucial malaria interventions like diagnostic treatments and training of healthcare workers. A mosquito net sent to someone in need is just $10; for every new Mosquito Joe customer signed during MCAW, a net was sent! This year our company raised over $24,000, sending 2,413 life-saving nets during Mosquito Control Awareness Week to those in need!

Mosquito Control Awareness Week 2018

The Buzz!

Our amazing franchisees were out there rocking it in their local communities to spread awareness around the importance of mosquito control. Mosquito Joe locations were featured 131 times across the U.S. and secured 14 TV segments in just one week. We’re excited so many franchisees were able to further educate their communities on mosquito control, and how important it really is to keep our families and furry friends itch-free! Check out a few highlights below:

We’re very proud of our franchisees and so happy we were able to give back to these non-profit organizations by supporting the amazing work that they do through our 2018 Beat the Bloodsuckers campaign. Mosquito Joe continues to partner with Nothing But Nets through our ongoing MoJo Bites Back campaign. To support us in our mission, consider donating to our MoJo Bites Back campaign as we raise funds for malaria and bring awareness to malaria-stricken areas. It will only cost you $10 to send a net; make a difference for a family in need today

Thanks to our participating franchisees, each blood bank that we partnered with, Nothing But Nets, and our AMAZING customers that helped make this year’s Beat the Bloodsuckers campaign the huge success that it was.

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Mosquito Joe has Teamed up With Nothing But Nets for MCAW 2018!

Did you know mosquito fossils date back as far as 100 million years ago? Yep, they’ve been around a long time so they aren’t going anywhere. Their journey from egg to adulthood is a short one; it only takes 4-7 days until they become biting adults. But in truth, not all mosquitoes bite. Only female mosquitoes bite because they need protein to lay eggs. They’re capable of laying 100 to 300 at a time. That’s right, 100-300 eggs, and they average about 1,000-3,000 in their lifetime. With these large numbers of mosquitoes come life-threatening diseases which are present in many countries across the world. Through our philanthropic efforts, Mosquito Joe is fighting back and making a difference by continuing our partnership with a national organization called Nothing But Nets. Our partnership with Nothing But Nets was launched a year ago because we know mosquitoes are more than just an annoyance, they’re a real health problem around the world. And today, witnessing what we can achieve together, we are more motivated than ever before.

What have we achieved together, you ask? In the past 12 months, between the MoJo Bites Back campaign and the Beat the Bloodsuckers campaign, 376 Mosquito Joe customers and franchisees have raised an incredible $28,405! Thanks to these efforts, Nothing But Nets was able to send 2,836 bed nets, protecting nearly 6,000 children in Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean from malaria. We think that is truly astounding and hope you do too!

Mosquito Joe has Teamed up With Nothing But Nets Campaign for Mosquito Control Awareness Week 2018!

Mosquito Control Awareness Week | Beat Those Bloodsuckers!
This year National Mosquito Control Awareness Week (MCAW) is June 24-June 30. MCAW is a time to educate the general public about the significance of mosquitoes in daily life and the important services provided by mosquito control workers. Mosquito Control Awareness Week is close to our hearts here at Mosquito Joe for obvious reasons.

Mosquito Joe will be raising money through our Beat the Bloodsuckers campaign to send these life-saving nets to families across the globe. For every new customer serviced during Mosquito Control Awareness week, Mosquito Joe will donate a bed net to Nothing But Nets. Help us Beat the Bloodsuckers and make a difference this Mosquito Control Awareness Week by signing up for service. A net will be donated for you or you can simply make a personal donation. Want to support your local Mosquito Joe and donate a net through their fundraising page? Click here to search for their location and donate a net in their honor.

Blood Banks- Mosquito Joe also partners with local blood banks across the country to raise money through our Beat the Bloodsuckers campaign. Participating Mosquito Joe locations will donate 10% of NEW customer sales during MCAW (June 24-30). Find your local Mosquito Joe location and inquire about how you can sign up for service and see how you can get involved!

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Nothing But Nets Leadership Summit 2018

At Mosquito Joe, we care about giving back to our communities just as much as we care about making outside fun again for our customers. One way that we accomplish this is by partnering with the Nothing But Nets foundation. The organization began in 2006 when sports writer Rick Reilly saw a need for greater protection against malaria and challenged his readers to donate $10 to send a mosquito net that would protect people in need around the world. Since then, the organization has done an amazing job raising awareness and funds, providing over 12 million bed nets to vulnerable populations in sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean. Last month, Mosquito Joe President Lou Schager and Director of Marketing Jayme Sabo joined Nothing But Nets at their annual Leadership Summit in Washington, DC.

Purpose

Held every year, the Nothing But Nets Leadership Summit gives the organization an opportunity to engage with their biggest supporters and aims to raise awareness as well as introduce attendees to the fundamental aspects of advocacy. The goal for this year’s summit was to urge Congress to maintain and increase funding for critical malaria programs like those of the United Nations, the President’s Malaria Initiative, and The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria.

Notable Speakers

Speakers at the event included:

  • Kathy Calvin, President and CEO, United Nations Foundation
  • Rick Reilly, American Sportswriter and Nothing But Nets Co-Founder
  • Charlie Webster, TV Host and Campaigner
  • Alexandra Daddario, Actress and Celebrity Champion
  • Quinn Tivey, The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation

The speakers did an excellent job providing an intimate look at malaria and how it not only affects populations abroad, but how it can affect us in the United States. Attendees were introduced to a number of different organizations that work with Nothing But Nets to combat other diseases such as AIDS, polio, and measles.

The key lesson learned from the Leadership Summit was to keep the momentum going when it comes to raising awareness and continuing the efforts to protect, as well as eliminate, malaria for populations worldwide. Jayme Sabo described her experience saying, “It was inspiring to see the legislative and advocacy process at work in real time. I was moved by how much we were able to accomplish.”

We’re proud to share that this year’s advocacy goal was achieved. You can read the details here. Last year, Mosquito Joe raised over $25,000 for Nothing But Nets, which means we sent 2,500 life-saving bed nets. This year, to bring the lessons we learned at the Summit to life, we’re going to keep that momentum going. Not only are we proud to partner with Nothing But Nets again, we’re aiming even higher!

For 2018, our goal is $40,000, and we’re starting right now.  Click here to help us with our MoJo Bites Back campaign! Just $10 can send a net and save a life, plus all donations up to $5,000 will be matched by us. Donate today and DOUBLE your impact!

We continue to be inspired by the generosity and support of our employees, franchisees and of course, our customers.  We look forward to that continuing in 2018! Thank you for making this the great company it is.

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Zika Virus Update: Where We Are Now

In 2016 it seemed as if Zika virus was front page news on a daily basis. It’s rapid spread across South and Central America followed by the first local transmissions in the U.S. put health experts and the public on high alert. Zika’s ability to cause serious birth defects when transmitted from mother to fetus was a major impetus in the global heath scare as well. But where is all the talk about Zika in 2017? From the lack of headlines about the virus this year, you might think that it’s no longer a concern. But that is far from true. Let’s take a look at the Zika virus situation, its health effects, and what’s being done about it.

Zika Numbers

As of August 16, 2017, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that there have been a total of 5,415 cases of Zika in the U.S.. 224 of those were acquired locally via mosquitoes, and another 49 were acquired through sexual transmission, laboratory transmission, and other person-to-person routes. 203 cases have been reported in 2017, all of them acquired via travel. So there has certainly been a decrease in case count from 2016, which reported over 5,000 cases alone.

In addition to the normal Zika monitoring, there is also a pregnancy surveillance system in place across the country to quickly identify those most at risk of the damaging consequences of Zika; pregnant women and their babies. Between 2016 and 2017, 2,112 cases of Zika were reported via the Pregnancy Registry in the U.S.. 93 of those cases resulted in birth defects such as microcephaly, hearing loss, and other brain abnormalities.

Transmission, Symptoms, Testing, and Treatment of Zika

Zika is primarily transmitted through the bite of an infected mosquito of the Aedes species. However, it can also be transmitted from mother to child during birth if the mother is infected during pregnancy. Zika can also be sexually transmitted during unprotected sex. There is still a lot to study in terms of how long Zika remains in the system after infection, but organizations such as the CDC are trying to get to the bottom of it.

The symptoms for Zika have not changed much from last year, but our understanding of them and how they should be tested have improved. Most people infected with Zika will experience mild to no symptoms whatsoever. Those experiencing symptoms could see fever, rash, headache, joint pain, red eyes, and muscle pain. These can last for up to a week as the virus usually remains in your blood for that long.

If you exhibit these symptoms, and especially if you have recently travelled to an area with Zika, consult your doctor about getting tested. Zika can be detected via blood or urine tests. Unfortunately, there is no treatment or vaccine for Zika virus at this time. The only thing to do is prevent infection or treat the symptoms once infected. This includes rest, drinking fluids, taking acetaminophen to reduce fever and pain, and protecting yourself against mosquito bites.

Zika Protection

Since there is no treatment or vaccination for Zika, the best way to protect yourself against it is to avoid traveling to areas with a high risk of infection and to protect yourself against mosquito bites. The easiest ways to do the latter includes wearing long sleeves and pants outside, remove standing water from your property, removing debris or brush from your gutters, using effective mosquito repellants, and even using professional mosquito control services like Mosquito Joe.

There is plenty of other information about Zika, the ongoing research behind it, and ways to protect yourself against it on the CDC website. Zika may not be in the news as much this year, but it is still a dangerous disease without a cure. So why not take necessary precautions to protect yourself and your family? Mosquito Joe offers barrier spray services applied to your property every 21 days that eliminate mosquitoes, fleas, and ticks so you can enjoy your outdoor space and add a layer of defense to your arsenal against diseases like Zika and West Nile. Call your local Mosquito Joe today for a free quote and more information.

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Aerial Spraying: Is it the Right Solution?

With mosquito borne illness on the rise and locally transmitted cases of Zika making headlines daily, people are naturally concerned about local vector control. In the fight against mosquitoes and the diseases they carry, local governments are feeling the pressure to formulate plans to keep their residents protected, especially in areas where Zika has been detected. For this reason, as the need to reduce the mosquito population and the spread of vector borne illness intensifies, aerial spraying is something that could be making headlines in your area.

What is Aerial Spraying?

Aerial spraying is the use of airplanes to treat large areas with insecticides as safely, quickly, and efficiently as possible. These products (which may vary by area) rapidly reduce both young and adult mosquitoes and can help to reduce the number of mosquitoes that carry the Zika virus and other mosquito borne illnesses.

A typical aerial-spraying program involves loading a solution of the insecticide and mineral oil in tanks. Nozzles create droplets that can get past the crowns of trees to hit the mosquitoes and areas where they live. Planes fly 100 to 300 feet above the ground.

Benefits of Aerial Spraying

  • Aerial spraying does not pose a health risk to humans, pets or wildlife when done correctly. During aerial spraying, a small amount of insecticide is sprayed over an area, usually about 1 ounce per acre or about the size of a football field.
  • Products that are being used are EPA registered. The EPA registration tells you that the product has demonstrated that it should not cause adverse effects on your health or the environment when used according to label instructions.
  • While it is only part of the solution for controlling mosquitoes, aerial spraying is a method that can quickly reduce the number of mosquitoes in a large area.

Challenges of Aerial Spraying

  • Weather conditions. There has to be ideal weather conditions for the planes and the product to be applied accurately. This can sometimes cause delays in treatment or directly impact its effectiveness.
  • Mass, less targeted approach. Unlike Mosquito Joe mosquito control treatments that are directly tailored to each individual property, aerial spraying is a mass approach to mosquito elimination with no room for customization. It’s a one size fits all solution.
  • The risk to beneficial insects. While the product can’t differentiate between insects that do important work and the ones that can make life difficult for us, there are ways that aerial spraying can be done to minimize the risk to beneficial insects. For example, spraying should be done during the time honeybees are inside their hives (dawn and dusk) to avoid adverse effects to the bee population.
  • Communication and timing. The general public has no control over when aerial spraying is done, and as with any situation when there is a need to get information to a large amount of people, it is hard for local agencies to get the word out about plans for spraying. Most agencies will mention it in the news and place it in the newspaper, but unfortunately that word doesn’t reach everyone. If the communication doesn’t reach you, you might not be able to prepare. While most people don’t need to do anything to prepare, for some, like beekeepers, that information could be vital.

 Alternative Options to Aerial Spraying

Regardless of whether or not aerial spraying is part of your city’s plans, there are plenty of actions you can take to help protect your family from mosquito bites:

  • Reduce standing water. Reducing sources of standing water in and around your yard can help eliminate breeding areas for mosquitoes.
  • Cover yourself. Mosquitoes feed at dawn and dusk, so if you’re going to be outdoors make sure you are in long sleeves and pants to avoid bites.
  • Professional mosquito control. Services like Mosquito Joe’s barrier spray treatments can keep your yard itch free, on your terms. These treatments are applied on a regular basis (every 2-3 weeks) and tailored to your yard, offering ongoing protection for your outdoor space.

Aerial spraying is one example of how municipalities are joining the fight against mosquito-borne illness by reducing the mosquito population. We encourage you to stay educated on what’s going on in your community and ensure you have an adequate defense plan of your own for mosquito control around your home.

More information on Zika or other mosquito-borne illnesses can be found Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. For more information on professional mosquito control options or to get a quote for a service plan for your home, check out MosquitoJoe.com.

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