What Temperature Kills Mosquitoes?

You’re ready to head outdoors, but before you do, you make sure to spray your clothes with insect repellant and light a citronella candle. After all, you don’t want to come home covered in mosquito bites. But do you have to worry about mosquitoes all year long? If you’re itching to know what temperature kills mosquitoes, keep reading to find out.

Cold Weather: A Mosquito’s Kryptonite

There’s a reason you mainly experience mosquito bites during the warmer months: these buzzing insects can’t survive cold weather. Once summer passes, you notice fewer of them on your daily walks. You can finally go to the pond without these blood-suckers attacking you. But just how cold must it get to kill mosquitoes?

Mosquito season in the United States begins in early spring and ends with the first freeze. As temperatures start to drop, mosquitoes become more lethargic. They are cold-blooded beings, which means they are unable to regulate their body temperature. This is why cold weather is a mosquito’s worst enemy.

Like many other creatures, mosquitoes hibernate in the colder months. But at what temperature do mosquitoes die? According to WebMD, the magic number seems to be around 50 degrees Fahrenheit. Or, that’s the temperature at which mosquitoes can no longer function.

Mosquito Eggs and Freezing Weather

It’s only logical to assume that if most mosquitoes die in cold weather, their eggs must also perish. Oh, if it were only that simple. Mosquito eggs seem to be quite resilient. Before diving in any deeper, it’s important to learn about a mosquito’s life cycle.

The average mosquito only lives about 2-3 months, and males die well before females. That’s not very much time to annoy humans, transmit disease, or reproduce, but these insects manage to get it all done. In the end, it’s not a lack of food or water that usually kills these insects. Most of the time, it’s due to their short lifespan or a sudden change in the weather.

Does freezing kill mosquitoes? Not necessarily. As long as the temperature remains above 50 degrees, the female should have enough energy to lay her eggs. And if she goes into hibernation before it freezes, a lucky female mosquito may live to see the next season.

Thankfully, however, not all mosquito species fare this well. Only mosquitoes from the genera Anopheles, Culex, and Culiseta hibernate in the winter. The rest just lay their eggs, say their goodbyes, and perish in the freezing weather.

What about her eggs? Mosquito eggs can withstand freezing temperatures. The eggs will survive the winter and emerge as temperatures rise. Even after a polar vortex, you can still expect baby mosquitoes to hatch during the spring.

What to Expect as Temperatures Rise

Winter doesn’t last forever, and the decrease in mosquito bites you enjoy during the colder months is only temporary. As the weather begins to warm back up, new mosquitoes will hatch and you can expect them to have an insatiable hunger for your blood.

Warmer weather doesn’t mean you have to suffer through another itchy mosquito season. Mosquito Joe can help stop mosquitoes before they get out of control. We have effective mosquito solutions to keep your family protected. Visit our website or call 1-855-275-2563 to learn how our barrier spray treatment will keep your yard mosquito-free all year long.

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Can Dogs Get Mosquito Bites?

As you take your dog for a walk in the park, you can’t help but notice his thick, impenetrable fur coat. This fur protects him from the sun and keeps him warm during the winter. But there’s one question that you can’t quite seem to figure out: Can dogs get mosquito bites?

Yes, they can. And just like humans, these bites cause aggravating symptoms and sometimes devastating illness. There are many reasons why you should watch out for mosquito bites on your furry friend.

Symptoms of Mosquito Bites on Dogs

If you thought your dog’s fur provided some protection against mosquitoes, you were partially correct. Mosquitoes look for easy targets, and navigating the thick hair of a Chow-Chow isn’t worth the effort. So, where do mosquitoes bite dogs? These insects are more likely to target exposed skin. The most common places on a dog that mosquitoes bite are ears, belly, and nose. Unfortunately, your hairless chihuahua is a prime target all over.

Can Dogs Get Mosquito Bite Bumps?

Yes, they can. Mosquito bites on pets look very similar to those on us, forming raised, red welts, and, unfortunately, are often very itchy. You may notice your pet frantically scratching one particular spot. Some bites cause skin irritation or temporary hair loss. In most cases, however, your dog will recover quickly. The itching usually subsides after a few days and the welt typically resolves on its own.

Dangers of Mosquito Bites and Dogs

Are mosquito bites on dogs dangerous? Most of the time, no. A mosquito bite will simply annoy your dog for a few days. Some vets recommend applying an antihistamine ointment to help control the itch. You can also try a cold compress to provide additional relief. It probably won’t be long before your dog is back to his old self again.

However, that isn’t always the case. Mosquitoes can transmit dangerous, sometimes deadly diseases such as West Nile virus, Eastern equine encephalitis, and systemic lupus erythematosus to your dog. Thankfully, these diseases are very rare, but if you notice any concerning symptoms such as lethargy, vomiting, or fever, report them to your vet right away.

Can Dogs Get Heartworms from Mosquito Bites?

Yes, and it’s quite common. It only takes a single bite by a mosquito infected with heartworm larvae for your dog to get sick. Heartworms are very dangerous. The adult worms may travel to your pet’s heart or lungs, causing blood clots, respiratory distress, or organ failure. If left untreated, heartworm disease may prove fatal.

How to Prevent Mosquitoes from Biting Your Dog

Mosquito bites are no fun for anyone, and your dog is no exception. Here are some tips to protect your pets from mosquitoes:

  • Get your dog on a preventative heartworm treatment.
  • Spray freshly squeezed lemon juice on your dog’s fur before heading outdoors. Be careful—citronella and certain essential oils are harmful to pets.
  • Install window screens and storm doors to keep mosquitoes out of your home.
  • Schedule a barrier spray treatment from Mosquito Joe to rid your property of mosquitoes.
  • Dress your pet in a doggie shirt or jacket to deter hungry mosquitoes.
  • Remove sources of standing, stagnant water from your yard.

 

Keeping your pets and family safe from mosquitoes starts at home. At Mosquito Joe, we offer pet-safe ways to eliminate these insects before they become a problem. Connect with us online or call 1-855-275-2563 to learn more about our barrier sprays and natural treatments.

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What Diseases Do Mosquitoes Carry

Is there anything worse than the red, swollen, itchy welt left behind by mosquitoes? It turns out, there is. Those bites can be made worse because mosquitoes can transmit a variety of diseases. Some of them you’ve heard of before, but others aren’t as well-known. So, what diseases do mosquitoes carry? Keep reading to find out.

The Mosquito Bite Transmission Process

Before diving into the nitty-gritty, you should learn how mosquito-borne diseases are transmitted. Mosquitoes have long, skinny mouths. The tip is pointy and sharp, and the mosquito uses it to pierce your flesh. After breaking the skin, the mosquito sucks your blood. They’re literally the vampires of the insect world.

However, mosquitoes can only digest fresh, liquid blood. Their saliva produces an anticoagulant to keep its victim’s blood from clotting. Yes, it’s like something out of a science fiction movie! Unfortunately, the saliva can also contain bacteria, parasites, or viruses. And if an infected mosquito bites you, it may transmit the disease into your bloodstream.

Mosquito Diseases Everyone Should Know About

Although most mosquito bites produce an itchy histamine reaction, some also cause serious illness. Symptoms can appear a few days or even weeks after infection. Here are some mosquito diseases to keep on your radar:

  • West Nile Virus

Perhaps the most famous mosquito virus, West Nile causes a range of symptoms, ranging from mild to severe. If you’re lucky, you won’t experience any symptoms. However, some people end up with constant vomiting, diarrhea, joint pain, and fever. And in the worst cases, patients end up with meningitis or brain infections.

  • Zika Virus

Zika virus is mild in most cases, but it can be devastating for pregnant women. The virus may cause serious birth defects, such as a small head or brain damage. Pregnant women should avoid mosquito bites in regions where Zika is present for this very reason.

  • Malaria

Malaria is a widespread disease in many parts of the world. Contrary to popular belief, it’s not caused by a virus, but rather a parasite. Malaria can cause a high fever, headache, and vomiting. Luckily, there are anti-malaria drugs available.

  • Dengue

The dengue fever causes a range of strange and frightening symptoms, like easy bruising, bleeding gums, and rashes. Some people may get a deadly hemorrhagic fever.

  • Chikungunya Virus

Chikungunya is common in Africa, India, and Asia. However, infected mosquitoes have migrated to other regions in recent years. Those infected often experience swollen joints, muscle pain, and rash. Although it’s not usually deadly, you may have noticeable symptoms for several months.

  • La Crosse Encephalitis

Luckily, La Crosse Encephalitis is very rare. Only about 65 cases occur each year in the United States. Although you’ll most likely only experience fever or nausea, the virus can damage the nervous system.

  • Yellow Fever

Mosquitoes in Africa or Latin America often transmit yellow fever. The disease causes jaundice, which can make your skin look yellow, hence its name. Be sure to get the vaccine before traveling to high-risk countries.

  • Rift Valley Fever

Mosquitoes can transmit rift valley fever, which can infect both humans and animals. It’s most common in Africa. Symptoms include weakness, dizziness, and vision impairment.

  • Jamestown Canyon Virus

You may never know if you catch the Jamestown Canyon virus. That’s because the symptoms are the same as the common flu. But it can also affect the brain and spinal column. Although this virus can be spread throughout the United States and primarily in the upper midwest, this mosquito-borne disease is rare.

  • Snowshoe Hare Virus

If a mosquito bite causes dizziness, headaches, vomiting, or a rash, you may have snowshoe hare virus. It can also lead to serious problems, including inflammation of the brain. This virus is most common in Canada, Alaska, and eastern Asia.

Whew! That’s a long list of diseases. There’s good news, however. Many of these illnesses only affect other countries. So, what diseases do mosquitoes carry in the United States? West Nile is the most common, but there were only 958 reported cases in 2019. Zika, chikungunya, and dengue are also present. And although rare, Jamestown Canyon virus is only found in the United States.

Avoid Getting Sick in the First Place

What causes mosquito-borne diseases? Mosquito bites. If you don’t want to get sick, you need to prevent bites before they happen. These insects like to hide in tall grass, weeds, and wooded areas. They also like stagnant water. When heading outdoors, try to cover as much skin as possible. Although mosquitoes can bite through fabrics, they’re more likely to move along to find another victim.

Mosquitoes don’t like certain smells. Spraying your clothing with DEET is one way to repel these pests. However, never use it around young children. Citronella, peppermint, and eucalyptus oils also keep mosquitoes away. Even crushed up garlic will stop the appetite of a hungry mosquito.

The best way to get rid of mosquitoes for good is with regular property treatments. If you see too many mosquitoes flying around your yard, Mosquito Joe can help. We offer barrier spray mosquito treatments that last for weeks. Visit us online or call 1-855-275-2563 to keep your family protected from mosquito diseases.

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Beat the Bloodsuckers: Mosquito Control Awareness Week 2018

 

Each year Mosquito Joe recognizes the importance of Mosquito Control Awareness Week through our Beat the Bloodsuckers campaign. Our goal is to raise awareness in the communities in which we operate about the importance of mosquito control and the amazing work of non-profits like blood banks and Nothing But Nets. Although this week falls during one of our busiest months of the year, it does not stop our passionate franchisees from giving back in their communities. This year, National Mosquito Control Awareness Week(MCAW), recognized by the American Mosquito Control Association, fell on June 24th – June 30th, and it was a memorable week for Mosquito Joe.

Mosquitoes date back to over 100 million years, which means they’re not going anywhere anytime soon so it’s important to protect your families and furry friends. Not only are they nuisances who ruin your outdoor fun, but they can transmit dangerous diseases such as Zika, West Nile Virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE). The diseases mosquitoes carry make them one of the deadliest creatures on earth, responsible for over 1 million deaths every year. Luckily, here in the U.S. we’re able to combat these pesky bugs with a professional mosquito control service like Mosquito Joe. Our franchisees are dedicated to spreading awareness about mosquitoes and the illnesses they cause as well as working to fight off mosquito populations in their local areas. MCAW brings professional mosquito control to light and we’re thankful for this opportunity to give back.

Beat The Bloodsuckers

This is Mosquito Joe’s sixth year participating in our Beat the Bloodsuckers campaign. Franchisees had the opportunity to partner with a local blood bank in their area or with our philanthropic partner, Nothing But Nets. Mosquito Joe locations across the country joined with local blood banks donating 10% of new customer sales from that week to their blood bank of choice. This year we were able to donate over $7,000 and partner with 26 blood banks!

For the second year in a row, Mosquito Joe partnered with Nothing But Nets, a global grassroots campaign that was established in 2006. Since then, they’ve raised over $65 million to help deliver 12 million bed nets to families in need, along with other crucial malaria interventions like diagnostic treatments and training of healthcare workers. A mosquito net sent to someone in need is just $10; for every new Mosquito Joe customer signed during MCAW, a net was sent! This year our company raised over $24,000, sending 2,413 life-saving nets during Mosquito Control Awareness Week to those in need!

Mosquito Control Awareness Week 2018

The Buzz!

Our amazing franchisees were out there rocking it in their local communities to spread awareness around the importance of mosquito control. Mosquito Joe locations were featured 131 times across the U.S. and secured 14 TV segments in just one week. We’re excited so many franchisees were able to further educate their communities on mosquito control, and how important it really is to keep our families and furry friends itch-free! Check out a few highlights below:

We’re very proud of our franchisees and so happy we were able to give back to these non-profit organizations by supporting the amazing work that they do through our 2018 Beat the Bloodsuckers campaign. Mosquito Joe continues to partner with Nothing But Nets through our ongoing MoJo Bites Back campaign. To support us in our mission, consider donating to our MoJo Bites Back campaign as we raise funds for malaria and bring awareness to malaria-stricken areas. It will only cost you $10 to send a net; make a difference for a family in need today

Thanks to our participating franchisees, each blood bank that we partnered with, Nothing But Nets, and our AMAZING customers that helped make this year’s Beat the Bloodsuckers campaign the huge success that it was.

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Mosquito Joe has Teamed up With Nothing But Nets for MCAW 2018!

Did you know mosquito fossils date back as far as 100 million years ago? Yep, they’ve been around a long time so they aren’t going anywhere. Their journey from egg to adulthood is a short one; it only takes 4-7 days until they become biting adults. But in truth, not all mosquitoes bite. Only female mosquitoes bite because they need protein to lay eggs. They’re capable of laying 100 to 300 at a time. That’s right, 100-300 eggs, and they average about 1,000-3,000 in their lifetime. With these large numbers of mosquitoes come life-threatening diseases which are present in many countries across the world. Through our philanthropic efforts, Mosquito Joe is fighting back and making a difference by continuing our partnership with a national organization called Nothing But Nets. Our partnership with Nothing But Nets was launched a year ago because we know mosquitoes are more than just an annoyance, they’re a real health problem around the world. And today, witnessing what we can achieve together, we are more motivated than ever before.

What have we achieved together, you ask? In the past 12 months, between the MoJo Bites Back campaign and the Beat the Bloodsuckers campaign, 376 Mosquito Joe customers and franchisees have raised an incredible $28,405! Thanks to these efforts, Nothing But Nets was able to send 2,836 bed nets, protecting nearly 6,000 children in Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean from malaria. We think that is truly astounding and hope you do too!

Mosquito Joe has Teamed up With Nothing But Nets Campaign for Mosquito Control Awareness Week 2018!

Mosquito Control Awareness Week | Beat Those Bloodsuckers!
This year National Mosquito Control Awareness Week (MCAW) is June 24-June 30. MCAW is a time to educate the general public about the significance of mosquitoes in daily life and the important services provided by mosquito control workers. Mosquito Control Awareness Week is close to our hearts here at Mosquito Joe for obvious reasons.

Mosquito Joe will be raising money through our Beat the Bloodsuckers campaign to send these life-saving nets to families across the globe. For every new customer serviced during Mosquito Control Awareness week, Mosquito Joe will donate a bed net to Nothing But Nets. Help us Beat the Bloodsuckers and make a difference this Mosquito Control Awareness Week by signing up for service. A net will be donated for you or you can simply make a personal donation. Want to support your local Mosquito Joe and donate a net through their fundraising page? Click here to search for their location and donate a net in their honor.

Blood Banks- Mosquito Joe also partners with local blood banks across the country to raise money through our Beat the Bloodsuckers campaign. Participating Mosquito Joe locations will donate 10% of NEW customer sales during MCAW (June 24-30). Find your local Mosquito Joe location and inquire about how you can sign up for service and see how you can get involved!

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